Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Little boy studying mathematics - Photo. It's not what you expect.

This child works as a cattle-herder in Northern Nigeria.  This man photographed him as he studied his trigonometry while watching over his cattle. 
http://www.lailasblog.com/2016/08/fulani-boy-reading-and-feeding-cows.html
Advertisement: Read my books.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Profiles: Work in the past and work in the future


...
More on the shortened workday / workweek here and here: UpNaira // The world can afford to shrink the workweek.

It does seem imperative that we adjust to a post-industrial lifestyle, with more play and leisure, more sleep and rest, and less "work" per se. 
In what ways will we adjust education to these realities?  
For example, what skills are important and what are being / have been automated away? 
What school-and-work behaviours are important and what are 20th-century anachronisms? 
Will we have more teachers or fewer?  More professors or fewer? 
Will we always have mathematics and mathematicians and what questions should occupy them? 
Will people work in multiple careers simultaneously (parallel) or single careers consecutively (series)? 
Will everybody have access to basic pay and resources to let them work and play as they will, or will there remain an imperative to find work to earn basic pay for survival?  

Kindly take some time to think about these things and start a discussion with friends. 

Advertisement: Read my books.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Sweet Jesus! They made it in America.

Their paths took them through advanced mathematics before they discovered applications in bioengineering research out in California.
1. David Van Valen: He went to MIT at the age of 14, and now he’s changing the world.
2. John Dabiri: Sexiest Scientist?  But seriously now, he's changing the world too.

They are black. Their lives matter. It's really not rocket science.

Advertisement: Read my books.

Monday, May 30, 2016

Using the internet (more fully) for scientific communication (finally!)



Advertisement: Read my books.

Blurb: Preprints are a way in which a manuscript containing scientific results can be rapidly communicated from one scientist, or a a group of scientists, to the entire scientific community. This video by ASAPbio (Accelerating Science and Publication in biology) explains what preprints are and their benefits, how they differ from journal publications, and how scientists can use both mechanisms to communicate their work.

Monday, May 16, 2016

I love you, Coursera! And all the other MOOC platforms too.



To learn math online,
there's Khan Academy with elementary math
and you can follow that up with Calculus and such
before running out of high-quality, sleekly-produced lessons. 

For advanced math(s),
there are some nice recorded lectures - everything from Fields Medalist symposia on youtube to full semesters from the OCW-era;
there were some false-starts at providing sexy math MOOCs but plagued with poor audio and sorta boring speakers;
and there is this site/utility that is in-between levels, this one :) , seeking to be accessible yet interesting to any math enthusiast; 
but GIVE IT A LITTLE TIME...
and there'll be more open math, allowing anybody anywhere get engaged/obsessed/expert 

Learning Mathematics the easy way in the 21st century - Coursera.org

Already, there is quite a lot on mathematics and allied subjects (e.g. engineering, science, data analysis, computing, ...) that is very good and very attractive.  Have you tried a math mooc yet?   I've reported on some of my experiments teaching with Coursera here.  What has your experience been? 
Maths the easy way in the 21st centurty - edx.org

I'm just amazed to have such access to world-class education, and that's why I'm addicted to MOOC life. 

Advertisement: Read my books.

Monday, April 4, 2016

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

See the solar system: true-colour images


Advertisement: Read my books.

Ever wonder what space actually looks like to the human eye?  Michael Benson tries his best to show you in his exhibition Otherworlds: Visions of Our Solar System. The artist took data from NASA and ESA missions to make 77 images of everything from Pluto to Europa that approximate true color as much as humanly possible. The work spans five decades of space exploration, and presents a realistic, flyby tour of the universe.  Source: wired.com

About Me

My Other Blogs

Followers